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Showing posts from August, 2022

The Future of Speed, Time and Consequences

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When supercomputers are upgraded the amount of information they can process in a second of time increases. Researchers report that between the years 1956 and 2015, there was a one-trillion-fold increase in what a supercomputer could process in a second of time.  Our brains, however, haven't noticeably improved their processing speed during the same timeframe.   Speed can create interesting phenomena.  Speed has the effect of stretching a second so more can be accomplished during it.  It's almost as if the faster something moves the slower time passes.  We see this illustrated in the movie Matrix. Neo was taught to stretch time so he could avoid incoming bullets.  Today's supercomputers have Neo-like capabilities - they can stretch a second so more gets done.

The Frontlines of Artificial Intelligence with Expert Giri Athuluru

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In this episode, we visit the frontlines of AI with expert Giri Athuluru, Co-Founder and CEO of ExperienceFlow.ai .  Most AI, as we have known it, has been used for very specific and narrow applications.  Today, however, AI is moving up the value change and providing critical assistance to leaders and the C-Suite.   Assisting leaders takes a unique application of AI that looks across a much larger set of data and KPIs to provide useful advice.  Join us in this fascinating discussion about AI's limits and new capabilities for industry and ecosystem leaders. ************************************************************************ Kevin Benedict Partner | Futurist at TCS View my profile on LinkedIn Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict Join the Linkedin Group Digital Intelligence ***Full Disclosure: These are my personal opinions. No company is silly enough to claim them. I work with and have worked with many of the companies mentioned in my articles.

The Future of Post-Retirement with Expert Paul Tyler

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In the next 28 years, the global population of humans over the age of 65 will nearly double.  In that same timeframe, the population of people over age 80 will triple.  All of these developments are coming simultaneously as we are about to achieve significant life extensions.  These developments will change the world.  What will all this mean for the future of retirement, social services, healthcare, the economy, and elder care?  Join us for this discussion with expert Paul Tyler, CMO with Nassau Financial Group, a company focused on term life, final expense policies, fixed annuities, delivering guaranteed income, protecting savings, and paying for healthcare costs. ************************************************************************ Kevin Benedict Partner | Futurist at TCS View my profile on LinkedIn Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict Join the Linkedin Group Digital Intelligence ***Full Disclosure: These are my personal opinions. No company is silly enough to claim

The Loss of Distance and Justification to Worry

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Historically distance has limited what we must worry about.  Our cave-dwelling ancestors only had to worry about being heard, seen or smelled by predators or enemies in their immediate surroundings.  As time went by large human armies could retreat and separate themselves by 100 miles, which during the Roman era equated to 5 days of marching.  That meant they didn't have to worry about a battle happening for at least 5 days.  Today it is different. One hundred miles equates to mere seconds. The security of distance has died.  Today, we must worry about wider circles.

The Cultural Trait that Changed the World

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In Oded Galor's insightful book, The Journey of Humanity , she analyzes history to reveal patterns that led to accelerated progress and higher standards of living. Some of the cultural traits that positively impacted societies include cooperation, trust, higher levels of gender equality, an entrepreneurial spirit and a future-oriented mindset.   In addition to the cultural traits, Galor identified good and bad geographies for food production, the kinds of institutions that are helpful, and  the right amount of diversity that helps improve a region's standard of living.  We learn that diversity helps up to the point where it jeopardizes social cohesion.