Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Defining Web 3.0 and Developing the Fastest Enterprise Mobility Apps

Bona fide
I value a strong opinion.  Especially when the opinionated is an expert and willing to stand up and place a flag in the sand.  In this article, my ambitious friend, programming guru, gamer, colleague, bona fide geek and mobility expert Peter Rogers shares his opinions on the meaning of Web 3.0 and how it will impact mobile application development and the enterprise.  While he is English and prone to use words like whilst, that should not be held against him.

I have two ambitions in life: to be the first person to define Web 3.0 in a meaningful way; and to be able to reform Atomic Kitten to sing at my next birthday. Only one of these is achievable so here goes.

The Web is changing quite drastically and there are ten key factors that define the next "Web" hereafter as Web 3.0:

  1. The dropping of legacy browsers like Internet Explorer 6, 7 and 8; and the subsequent focus around HTML 5 and ECMAScript 5.1 capable browsers
  2. The realisation in the marketplace that JQuery does not produce maintainable code, and that there is a shift to second generational MV* frameworks like Angular, Backbone, Ember and Meteor; combined with the definition of the job role of JavaScript Architect as opposed to a Web Developer
  3. The evolution of JavaScript and HTML 5 to support a genuine component based framework (Web Components) with the necessary tools to deliver something close to a native experience including genuine realtime networking (UDP using WebRTC)
  4. The growth in Cloud PaaS Node hosting to offer end-to-end JavaScript solutions through the MEAN (MongoDB, Express, Angular, Node) stack
  5. The second generational move away from pure RWD as a golden bullet solution
  6. The increase in the performance offered by next generation web browsers powered by WebKit2 and Blink that can take advantage of multi-CPU/GPU chipsets
  7. The shift into 4 tier architectures and API driven solutions with API Gateways and reduced middle tiers, that enable a much higher scalability that was previously considered possible
  8. The emergence of Cloud Transformation, Cloud Build, Cloud Cross-compilation and Mobile Backend as a Service solutions
  9. Beyond Mobile First solutions offering Embedded JavaScript for IoT (Internet of Things)
  10. The increase in power of PhoneGap solutions through better Web View browser based capabilities (Android 4.4 / iOS 8)

The first point is a very distinct abandonment of legacy browsers and a full adoption of ECMAScript 5.1 and HTML5. This is going to upset a lot of people but the truth of the matter is JQuery 2.0 and AngularJS have both taken this approach and support Internet Explorer 9 and above. That is not to say you cannot do a few hacks to get Angular working on Internet Explorer or using the 1.X branch of JQuery, but the wheels have been set in motion. Why have a bloated library that is twice the size due to browsers not supporting the current feature track.

There is also a definite demand for skills in the market in next generational frameworks and I call out Angular and Backbone as leading the way commercially, with Ember and Meteor also highly respected frameworks. This is created by a demand to build a higher quality of Web Applications and the learnings of the last projects of what went wrong when anyone tried to maintain the last attempt. The job specification is no longer “Web Developer” but instead it is “JavaScript Architect”. I interview a lot of people and the majority of web developers with 5 – 10 years of experience still do not know the following seven vital things:

  1. The difference between == and ===
  2. The scoping rules of JavaScript (what happens if you don’t use ‘var’ or if you declare variables in a block scope as opposed to a functional scope)
  3. That an array is not actually an array at all and works much slower than expected
  4. What prototypal inheritance is and why you shouldn’t make code look like Java (pseudo-classical inheritance)
  5. That JSON is actually a subset of JavaScript’s Object Literal Notation and that its built into the language
  6. That the DOM is actually written in C/C++ and the context switch is why it is so slow working with DOM based libraries like JQuery
  7. How a Closure actually works

HTML5 is evolving to offer built in templating support, the ability to watch objects (which will speed up Angular) and Web Components (which offer Angular Directives). The native level support will offer a massive performance boost to frameworks having to fake all these features like Polymer and Angular. It will also encourage people who are not familiar with these next generational frameworks to get in on the action. As I am from a gaming background then I always complain that TCP (Web Sockets) is not genuinely real-time, so I look forward to seeing UDP (WebRTC) solutions being delivered like Desktop Sharing in Chrome 34.

Cloud Mobile Backend as a Service and Platform as a Service are offering small companies the ability to start working with the server side as well as the client side. Whereas finding an Application Service Provider (ASP) that supported Java EE and building a set of Java EE servers was a bit of a hassle, you can easily get a free Heroku account and create Node/Express servers in minutes rather than hours. The combination of MongoDB, Express, Angular and Node (the MEAN stack) will enable complete product solutions to be built at budget prices.

It goes without saying (although I am going to say it) that companies who thought RWD was a golden bullet will be taking a second look at that decision, especially when they find their web developers cannot seriously code JavaScript.

People often forget, when they talk about HTML5 performance, that the current web browsers cannot yet take advantage of multi-CPU/GPU chipsets that have been around for many years. If an Apple device has a quad-core CPU and quad-core GPU but the web browser can only work on a single processor then clearly we are getting a fraction of the performance – and it is not a quarter or a sixteenth as this is exponential! Soon this will change and performance should not be an issue for a time.

A few recent scalability nightmares including the season premier of Game of Thrones Series 4 on Netflix and the original Iron Man Blu-Ray BD Live feature, which both boasted the most simultaneous web hits of their generation. A shift into 4 tier architectures, with high end scalability empowered by asynchronous backend systems, and effective Cloud utilisation will be required to offer new highly desirable services. This will include more API driven approaches using API Gateways and a lighter middle tier moving away from monolithic Java EE heavy middleware solutions.

Whilst we are on the topic of the Cloud, the increase of Cloud Transformation, Cloud Build, Cloud Cross-compilation, Cloud Mobile Backend as a Service and API Gateways will be employed to power a lot of the front end technology. I find Cloud Cross-Compilation and Cloud Build particularly interesting as they enable developers to write in JavaScript and then use technologies like HyperLoop, Intel XDK or CocoonJS to transform this into native code and remotely built the code to include additional libraries which may even include a new browser version.

IoT Mentioner
No blog article on Kevin’s site can go without mentioning Internet of Things, so I have to mention that Beyond Mobile-First in JavaScript terms is talking about Embedded JavaScript and this enables us to use the most popular language in wearable technology as well. Tizen OS is a good front runner of this technology and Firefox OS now powers one of the cheapest phones in India.

Finally the last thing holding back HTML5 was the massive drop in functionality and performance when it was wrapped using a Web View. Luckily Android 4.4 offers us Chrome 30 support and using Cloud Build systems then we can even access the 3D features of Chrome 33. Following suite iOS 8 now enables us to have web applications that can use Nitro (their JIT solution). It will take time for PhoneGap to catch up with some of these new advancements of course, but the future is even looking better for wrapped web.

Now all we need is a way to monetize and distribute pure web applications on a popular operating system with a profitable App Store and we really have a reason to sing the name of “Web 3.0”.

************************************************************************
Kevin Benedict
Writer, Speaker, Senior Analyst
Digital Transformation, EBA, Center for the Future of Work Cognizant
View my profile on LinkedIn
Learn about mobile strategies at MobileEnterpriseStrategies.com
Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict
Join the Linkedin Group Strategic Enterprise Mobility
Join the Google+ Community Mobile Enterprise Strategies
Recommended Strategy Book Code Halos
Recommended iPad App Code Halos for iPads

***Full Disclosure: These are my personal opinions. No company is silly enough to claim them. I am a mobility and digital transformation analyst, consultant and writer. I work with and have worked with many of the companies mentioned in my articles.

Mobile Commerce News Weekly – Week of August 24, 2014

The Mobile Commerce News Weekly is an online newsletter made up of the most interesting news, articles and links related to mobile commerce and marketing, mobile payments, mobile money, e-wallets, mobile banking, mobile ads and mobile security that I run across each week.  I am specifically targeting market size and market trend information.

Also read Connected Globe News Weekly
Also read Mobile Cyber Security News Weekly
Also read Mobile Health News Weekly
Also read Mobility News Weekly

Looking for an enterprise mobility solution?  Read the Mobile Solution Directory Here!

Mobile commerce grew 48 percent year-over-year to about $8 billion in the second quarter, according to data released by comScore and the U.S. Census Bureau. That's the fastest increase in mobile commerce since the first quarter of 2012.  Read Original Content

According to a study by research firm Ericsson ConsumerLab, Indonesians are the most frequent users of money transfer services when compared to Bangladesh and Vietnam. The study found over half of respondents in Indonesia have used money transfer services compared with 45 percent in Vietnam and 34 percent in Bangladesh.  Read Original Content

St George bank is set to utilize fingerprint recognition software on the iPhone S5 to bring quick and secure banking to mobile customers. Known as Touch ID, the biometric login will be the first of its kind for mobile banking in Australia, and will be rolled out for use on the iPhone 5S from September.  Read Original Content

The cost and time to mobilize enterprise applications can actually meet or exceed the original cost and time to implement those systems. In their new report, “StarMobile Transforms Enterprise Apps into Mobile Apps”, 451 Research details the advantages of StarMobile’s app development tool and how it can drastically reduce the cost and time to mobilize enterprise applications. Download report here: http://starmobileinc.com/report-451research-starmobile-transforms-mobile-apps-into-enterprise-apps/

Of 1000 US adults polled for the American Bankers Association by Ipsos Public Affairs, 31 percent say the Web is their preferred banking method, making it the most popular channel. However, this represents a sharp fall off from the 39 percent recorded in 2013.  Read Original Content

In June 2014 a BankChoice Monitor survey of people shopping for new banking relationships found 63 percent of females want their new bank to provide mobile banking compared to 58 percent of males.  Read Original Content
Many U.S. merchants that place mobile at the core of their e-commerce strategy are reaping big rewards. The 366 U.S. retailers in the 2015 Mobile 500, released by Internet Retailer, will reach m-commerce sales of $59 billion in 2014, up 74 percent from $34 billion in 2013.  Read Original Content

The number of Brazilians using mobile devices for purchase of products and services has skyrocketed with an 84.2 percent increase over the last 12 months, according to recent research by consultancy firm e-Bit.  Read Original Content

As mobile commerce becomes more popular, security is becoming a greater priority. Zumingo Corporation, a leading provider of security solutions, has announced it has become the first member of the Wells Fargo Startup Accelerator.  Read Original Content

According to data from ReportsnReports, the global near field communication market is anticipated to reach US $16.25 billion by 2022, growing at an 8.83 percent compound annual growth rate. Furthermore, it is suggested America has the greatest market potential for the near field communication ecosystem.  Read Original Content

Last year Gartner said transaction value of NFC had dropped 40 percent, citing “disappointing adoption of NFC technology in all markets in 2012,” especially with high-profile e-wallet services, such as Google Wallet and Isis, a credit card e-payment venture between AT&T Mobility, T-Mobile U.S. Inc. and Verizon Wireless.  Read Original Content

Provider of payment solutions, Oxygen, has announced the launch of its mobile wallet service, called the Oxygen Wallet, which provides users the ability to transfer money and buy gifts for family and friends with whom they are connected over social networks.  Read Original Content

A recent report from mobile advertising, analytics and monetization firm, Flurry, revealed female mobile consumers dominate the mobile gaming scene.  Read Original Content

A report by management consultant McKinsey and the Gates Foundation has forecasted mobile payments in sub-Saharan African could reach up to $16 billion in the coming years if current trends continue across the continent.  Read Original Content

Facebook announced it will start telling advertisers on what device people saw an ad and on what device they took an action, such as buying a product or signing up for a test drive, as a result of seeing that ad. That means Facebook will be able to credit mobile ads that lead to desktop sales and desktop ads that result in mobile purchases.  Read Original Content

Mobile advertising revenue jumped to $19.3 billion in 2013, nearly doubling its total from the year prior, according to a new report from the Interactive Advertising Bureau, IAB Europe, and research firm IHS. North America made up the largest share of the mobile ad pie at 41.9 percent, while Asia-Pacific was not far behind at 38.9 percent.  Read Original Content

Latest Articles on http://mobileenterprisestrategies.blogspot.com

Resisting Technology is Like Resisting Aging
Smartphones, SMAC, Political Chaos and Hope
GIS and IoT Sensors Deliver Savings and Innovations for Utilities
Mobile Expert Interviews: OpenMarket's Andy Shirey
Mobile Expert Interviews: Cellrox's Dror Nadler
The Role of Shamification in Gamification in Enterprise Mobility

Webinars of Note (Recorded)

Virtualization ≠ Mobilization


Whitepapers of Note


A Comparison of the StarMobile MORPH Protocol vs. Traditional Remote Computing Protocols

Don't Get SMACked - How Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud are Reshaping the Enterprise
Making BYOD Work for Your Organization
StarMobile Transforms Enterprise Apps into Mobile Apps

************************************************************************
Kevin Benedict
Writer, Speaker, Senior Analyst
Digital Transformation, EBA, Center for the Future of Work Cognizant
View my profile on LinkedIn
Learn about mobile strategies at MobileEnterpriseStrategies.com
Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict
Join the Linkedin Group Strategic Enterprise Mobility
Join the Google+ Community Mobile Enterprise Strategies
Recommended Strategy Book Code Halos
Recommended iPad App Code Halos for iPads


***Full Disclosure: These are my personal opinions. No company is silly enough to claim them. I am a mobility and digital transformation analyst, consultant and writer. I work with and have worked with many of the companies mentioned in my articles.

Mobile Cyber Security News Weekly – Week of August 24, 2014

Welcome to the Mobile Cyber Security News Weekly, our newest online newsletter. Mobile Cyber Security will focus on the most interesting news, articles and links related to mobile and cyber security, mobile malware, mobile application management, cyber warfare (and more!) that I run across each week.  I am specifically targeting market trend information.

Also read Connected Globe News Weekly
Also read Mobile Commerce News Weekly
Also read Mobile Health News Weekly
Also read Mobility News Weekly

Looking for an enterprise mobility solution?  Read the Mobile Solution Directory Here!

Mobile software startup Lookout has raised one of the largest private investments in cyber security, accepting $150 million from some big fund managers to lock down smartphones showing up at corporate IT departments. Read Original Content

The European cyber security solutions and services market is estimated to grow from $25.04 billion in 2014 to $35.53 billion by 2019, at a combined annual growth rate of 7.20 percent from 2014 to 2019. Read Original Content

Driven by the thriving ecosystem, SNS Research estimates mobile device and network security investments will account for nearly $11 billion in 2014 alone. The market is further expected to grow at a combined annual growth rate of nearly 20 percent over the next six years. Read Original Content

The cost and time to mobilize enterprise applications can actually meet or exceed the original cost and time to implement those systems. In their new report, “StarMobile Transforms Enterprise Apps into Mobile Apps”, 451 Research details the advantages of StarMobile’s app development tool and how it can drastically reduce the cost and time to mobilize enterprise applications. Download report here: http://starmobileinc.com/report-451research-starmobile-transforms-mobile-apps-into-enterprise-apps/

A leaked report shows Apple's mobile operating system is the most secure against a specific spyware program used by the government. The document was anonymously leaked who got a hold of documents from Gamma Group, an international manufacturer of surveillance and monitoring systems. Read Original Content

Vodafone has become the first network to be awarded the new government-endorsed Cyber Essentials Plus accreditation for keeping customers’ data extremely secure. Read Original Content
Researchers from the Universities of Michigan and California say they’ve come up with a smartphone hack that can get into your Gmail account via your mobile device. A number of apps are affected by the vulnerability but Gmail was exploited with a 92 percent success rate. Read Original Content

Security researchers have revealed two separate threats this week they say could put up to 90 percent of the world's two billion-plus smartphones at risk of password theft, stolen data and in some cases let hackers take full control of devices. Read Original Content

Vietnamese smartphone users are advised to beware of Chinese-made handsets after a Beijing-based phone maker admitted recently it was collecting personal data without permission. Read Original Content

TechNavio's analysts forecast the cyber security market in the US Government sector will grow at a combined annual growth rate of 7.41 percent during the period 2013-2018. Read Original Content

The Latin America cyber security market is estimated to grow from around $5.29 billion in 2014 to $11.91 billion by 2019, at a combined annual growth rate of 17.6 percent from 2014 to 2019. Read Original Content

Latest Articles on http://mobileenterprisestrategies.blogspot.com

Resisting Technology is Like Resisting Aging
Smartphones, SMAC, Political Chaos and Hope
GIS and IoT Sensors Deliver Savings and Innovations for Utilities
Mobile Expert Interviews: OpenMarket's Andy Shirey
Mobile Expert Interviews: Cellrox's Dror Nadler
The Role of Shamification in Gamification in Enterprise Mobility

Webinars of Note (Recorded)


Virtualization ≠ Mobilization


Whitepapers of Note


A Comparison of the StarMobile MORPH Protocol vs. Traditional Remote Computing Protocols

Don't Get SMACked - How Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud are Reshaping the Enterprise
Making BYOD Work for Your Organization
StarMobile Transforms Enterprise Apps into Mobile Apps

************************************************************************
Kevin Benedict
Writer, Speaker, Senior Analyst
Digital Transformation, EBA, Center for the Future of Work Cognizant
View my profile on LinkedIn
Learn about mobile strategies at MobileEnterpriseStrategies.com
Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict
Join the Linkedin Group Strategic Enterprise Mobility
Join the Google+ Community Mobile Enterprise Strategies
Recommended Strategy Book Code Halos
Recommended iPad App Code Halos for iPads

***Full Disclosure: These are my personal opinions. No company is silly enough to claim them. I am a mobility and digital transformation analyst, consultant and writer. I work with and have worked with many of the companies mentioned in my articles.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Resisting Technology is Like Resisting Aging

Ved Sen
Global Head
Mobility Advisor Services
Cognizant
Digital transformation is often unnerving.  Our morning newspaper shifts to the iPad.  Our coffee is paid for on a mobile app.  Our taxis are hailed via mobile apps.  Our cars talk to us.  Our jobs and careers change as a result of SMAC (social, mobile, analytics and cloud) solutions.  How should we respond to all of these changes?

In this article we are blessed with insight from my London based friend and digital transformation and mobility expert Ved Sen. Enjoy!

My wife (Karuna) and I often differing views on a number of things, as is common. And almost always, she’s right. But there are some areas where we agree to disagree.

Karuna doesn’t drive a manual car. She’s very comfortable in an automatic. I love driving – either manual or automatic. Obviously, the automatic car is doing a whole lot of thinking for you. And probably doing a few things better. By matching the gear to the speed more effectively, it’s likely to be more fuel efficient especially in stop-start city driving. But like most people who drive a manual car, I hunker for the control of the stick shift and the level influence I have on the drive. It feels like I’m closer to the engine. The automatic car provides a level of abstraction and let’s anybody drive, without mastering the intricacies of gear shifts and clutch control. Somewhere in the recesses of my mind, the message keeps flashing: the automatic is all right, but a manual car is a real drive.

We have the opposite stances on Digital Cameras. As somebody who has formally learnt photography and spent time in dark-rooms developing prints, she loves the control, and human input into the process. I enjoy the fact that I can get great photographs by just framing the picture. Karuna gave me tips on framing but the camera does the rest – i.e. manage exposure, focus, lighting, and even the intensity and balance of colours. Of course, all of this comes bundled with a phone. No more wandering around with an SLR camera slung around your neck. I love it. For her its anathema.

The pattern here is simple, when we invest time and effort in building a skill, or a technique, we are invested in the process, not just the output. And what almost every technological advancement tends to do, is that it democratises is previously closely held skill, putting the same level of competence into the hands of amateurs and novices. For the experts this is distasteful or downright annoying, but more importantly, it’s often professionally disruptive. The former, because it devalues that expert process which we are attached to, and the latter, because it challenges their expertise and renders them less valuable.

“The Knowledge” is the course that all London Black Cab drivers go through. For decades, the London Cab has been famous – one of the icons of the city. Apart from the car itself, which is custom designed and manufactured for the purpose, the drivers are famed for their familiarity with the city and routes. The Knowledge comprises some 320 routes through London, and covers 25,000 streets and 20,000 landmarks. A black cab driver is expected to know them all. Qualifying takes 2-4 years on average. During the exam, they can be given any start point and end point in those hundreds of routes and they are expected to know the most efficient way of getting from start to finish. The number of qualified drivers is controlled. Typically, it takes an investment of 30,000 to become a cab driver, in addition to the 25 hours a week time invested over 3 years.  Typically, the London Cab is twice the price or more for journeys that take 30 minutes or more, compared to the privately run ‘mini-cabs’ that also operate in an organised manner in London.

Since the dawn of sat-navs any driver can find locations, routes, and optimise journeys with an investment of under a hundred pounds. Nowadays the smartphone does just as well. Today every user who gets into a taxi is more likely than not to have a device with him or her that can provide exactly the same level of knowledge about routes, directions and traffic conditions that the black cab driver has accumulated over 3 years. Short of injecting this knowledge into the brain, a la Matrix, the first time tourist in London is now as well equipped to navigate London as the black cab driver.

Of course, you still need to get a taxi, and the black cabs are ubiquitous in London so you’re likely to hail one anyway. Or you would, till the arrival of the brigade of taxi apps. And the poster child of taxi applications – Uber. Now you just send up a digital flare while you’re working your way through dessert and you can be sure that by the time you’re out on the street, the taxi is likely to be there. Not a London Cab but a less expensive car with a similar assurance of safety and comfort.

Not that London Cabs are luddites. The Hailo and Gettaxi  pps do exactly this for black cabs. The whole experience of calling a taxi has changed forever. You just broadcast a request and one of the many taxis which is the closest to your location responds. It’s the same for any category of cabs. Even the cab companies which take bookings do so through apps. It’s just that the price premium charged by London cabs is no longer sustainable.

There are plenty of other services run by local cab companies which come with Apps. I use a company called Swift  which has a reliable app and also one of the drivers, let’s call him Bob, asks me about it whenever he picks me up. The last time around we had a discussion about some of the features that the app should add. He is very engaged with the idea of the app making this experience better.

As I write this, all over the world, incumbent taxi services are warring with new services such as Uber and Lyft. Which are by the way, just marketplaces, and not car services, themselves. And clearly much of the legislation does not cover this model. So the incumbent services are lobbying the government for protection. In Germany, a cab license costs over $ 250,000. Understandably, drivers having paid that sum are not happy to see their returns diminished via competition from new and technologically enabled entrants. Many cities including Munich, Dusseldorf, Berlin and Hamburg are considering declaring Uber illegal. Their argument is primarily that as taxi services, Uber enabled cabs should pay the same license fee.

In Seoul, the government’s concerns are based around the safety of the vehicles, background checks on drivers, and the impact on the local taxi trade. The last may be the most honest reason, in most parts of the world. Even though in Seoul, Uber is more expensive than the regular taxis.

Even at home, in the US, Uber has faced the law – in Virginia for example, where Uber has been asked to ‘cease and desist’ by the government, till it obtains the ‘proper authority’.

Brussels has already banned Uber. Barcelona, Paris and other major European cities have discussed banning it. There have been strikes in London and Milan. All of these are typically examples of old markets and legislation trying to keep up with new business models. Even Neely Kroes has criticised the bans.

The pattern that repeats itself is that markets switch quickly, but legislation takes time. Most taxi apps now allow sharing, payments, and a host of other features which significantly improve the experience for the user.

Defending the old model even in the face of new technology creates a precipice from which the fall can be sudden and dramatic – witness the music industry, which reaped the benefits of digital technology for many years but failed to adapt to the internet’s new models. People find ingenious methods for using the new technology to the benefit of suppliers and customers, even as regulators and enforcers fume.

So where does that leave the Black Cab driver who has just spent years mastering “The Knowledge” to qualify to drive a black cab in London? Is this the end of the road for him? Is this one more example of technology rendering a valuable skill useless?

Your guess is as good as mine, but for a glimpse of what could happen, let me take you back a hundred and fifty years or so. It was the time of the invention and spread of photography. I’ve written about this in more detail here but the short version is this: photography democratised portraiture. And rendered hundreds of artists jobless. Any amateur armed with a camera could take a photo more accurate and lifelike than the best of painters. So what did these artists do? Many presumably changed professions, some undoubtedly fell on hard times. But out of this some decided that their role was not to represent reality but to interpret it. It is no surprise therefore that the birth of impressionism coincided with the spread of photography.

So when democratisation hits your area of expertise, as it will, sooner or later, will you find yourself with a choice of extinction or adaptation. Will you be like the impressionists and evolve? Or will you fall on your sword (or paintbrush)? Will you look for help to regulators? Or will you create new markets? After all, even decision making and ‘management’ expertise, is being democratised through analytics and knowledge systems.

Either way, the challenge for regulators as always, is to move at the pace of technology and markets. The challenge for you is to evolve to find or create a market as technology democratises your specialist skill. Resisting the change, though, is not really an option. You might as well try to resist aging.

************************************************************************
Kevin Benedict
Writer, Speaker, Senior Analyst
Digital Transformation, EBA, Center for the Future of Work Cognizant
View my profile on LinkedIn
Learn about mobile strategies at MobileEnterpriseStrategies.com
Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict
Join the Linkedin Group Strategic Enterprise Mobility
Join the Google+ Community Mobile Enterprise Strategies
Recommended Strategy Book Code Halos
Recommended iPad App Code Halos for iPads

***Full Disclosure: These are my personal opinions. No company is silly enough to claim them. I am a mobility and digital transformation analyst, consultant and writer. I work with and have worked with many of the companies mentioned in my articles.

Connected Globe News Weekly – Week of August 24, 2014

Welcome to Connected Globe News Weekly, an online newsletter that consists of the most interesting news and articles related to M2M (machine to machine) and embedded mobile devices.  I aggregate the information, include the original links and add a synopsis of each article.  I also search for the latest market numbers such as market size, growth and trends in and around the M2M market.

Also read Field Mobility News Weekly
Also read Mobile Commerce News Weekly
Also read Mobile Cyber Security News Weekly
Also read Mobile Health News Weekly
Also read Mobility News Weekly

Looking for an enterprise mobility solution?  Read the Mobile Solution Directory Here!

According to a report from research firm Berg Insight, 3G/4G technologies will dominate cellular M2M communications by 2018. Read Original Content

Vodafone has published its second annual M2M Adoption Barometer – a global survey of the machine-to-machine market – and pegs Asia Pacific to lead global adoption rates over the next two years. Global M2M adoption increased by over 80 percent in the past year to reach 22 percent, said the survey. Read Original Content

According to a release by ReportStack, analysts forecast the Global M2M Network Security market will grow at a CAGR of 22.9 percent over the period 2013-2018. Read Original Content

The cost and time to mobilize enterprise applications can actually meet or exceed the original cost and time to implement those systems. In their new report, “StarMobile Transforms Enterprise Apps into Mobile Apps”, 451 Research details the advantages of StarMobile’s app development tool and how it can drastically reduce the cost and time to mobilize enterprise applications. Download report here: http://starmobileinc.com/report-451research-starmobile-transforms-mobile-apps-into-enterprise-apps/

Berg Insight, a research and analysis company, published a new report The Global Wireless M2M Market expecting the number of M2M connections to grow by 21 percent this year to a total of 213.9 million connections by year end. Read Original Content

TechNavio's analysts forecast the global cellular M2M VAS market will grow at a combined annual growth rate of 37.24 percent over the period 2013-2018. Read Original Content
The market for Internet of Things devices and appliances is due to explode over the next several years, with 69 percent of U.S. consumers planning to buy network-connected technology for their homes by 2019, according to a new study by Accenture. Read Original Content

Nearly three-quarters of all Internet of Things devices are susceptible to getting hacked or compromised, according to a recent study. The study, released by Hewlett-Packard, examined ten common smart devices, including thermostats, smart TVs and webcams. Each device had approximately 25 vulnerabilities, the study claimed. Read Original Content

A report by the Acquity Groups claims the rise of the Internet of Things suggests there will be a 69 percent adoption rate of IoT devices by 2019, even though most don't know what it is. Read Original Content

Intel has joined forces with Chunghwa Telecom, Taiwan's largest wireless carrier, to develop technology related to the Internet of Things, cloud computing and software defined networking (SDN). Read Original Content

According to ABI Research, the installed base of active wireless connected devices will exceed 16 billion in 2014, about 20 percent more than in 2013. The number of devices will more than double from the current level, with 40.9 billion forecast for 2020. Read Original Content

Latest Articles on http://mobileenterprisestrategies.blogspot.com

GIS and IoT Sensors Deliver Savings and Innovations for Utilities
Mobile Expert Interviews: OpenMarket's Andy Shirey
Mobile Expert Interviews: Cellrox's Dror Nadler
The Role of Shamification in Gamification in Enterprise Mobility
Mobile Expert Interview: Motorola Solution's Mark Kirsten
Mobile Expert Interview: Harmon.ie's CEO Yaacov Cohen
Mobile and Digital Transformation on the Mercy Ships

Webinars of Note (Recorded)


Virtualization ≠ Mobilization


Whitepapers of Note


A Comparison of the StarMobile MORPH Protocol vs. Traditional Remote Computing Protocols

Don't Get SMACked - How Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud are Reshaping the Enterprise
Making BYOD Work for Your Organization
StarMobile Transforms Enterprise Apps into Mobile Apps

************************************************************************
Kevin Benedict
Writer, Speaker, Senior Analyst
Digital Transformation, EBA, Center for the Future of Work Cognizant
View my profile on LinkedIn
Learn about mobile strategies at MobileEnterpriseStrategies.com
Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict
Join the Linkedin Group Strategic Enterprise Mobility
Join the Google+ Community Mobile Enterprise Strategies
Recommended Strategy Book Code Halos
Recommended iPad App Code Halos for iPads

***Full Disclosure: These are my personal opinions. No company is silly enough to claim them. I am a mobility and digital transformation analyst, consultant and writer. I work with and have worked with many of the companies mentioned in my articles.

Smartphones, SMAC, Political Chaos and Hope

Capturing the physical world and
digitizing it.
Wael Ghonim, a former manager for Google in Egypt, and others used Facebook and Twitter to organize demonstrations throughout Cairo that ultimately forced a regime change.

While Twitter, Facebook and YouTube received most of the publicity for their roles in disseminating information during the Arab Spring, it was the smartphone connected to the Internet and SMAC (social, mobile, analytics and cloud) solutions that made it all possible. Smartphones enabled information to be collected, packaged and transmitted for mass distribution in near real-time.

Matt J. Duffy, a teacher of journalism and new media at Zayed University in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirate writes, "During the January 25 protests in Egypt, for instance, protesters would carry their smartphones with them into the streets.  They could offer first-hand reports using their smartphones connected to Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. Often their information was verified with short video clips or photographs taken from their phones and effortlessly weaved into Facebook or Twitter updates."  Rick Sanchez, a former CNN correspondent, added his views that, "The smartphone is and was “The best piece of news equipment ever invented.”

Mobile technologies connected to the Internet have demonstrated their ability to influence and organize change, and to help people become free from autocrats, but has it actually made things better?  Change, as we know, does not always equal better.

Author Thomas L. Friedman wrote a series of articles in the New York Times this month titled Order vs. Disorder.  In this week's article he quoted his teacher and author Dov Seidman, “Protecting and enabling freedoms,” says Seidman, “requires the kind of laws, rules, norms, mutual trust and institutions that can only be built upon shared values and by people who believe they are on a journey of progress and prosperity together.”

Many people, at no fault of their own, are born in lands with limited opportunities and freedoms.  The components identified above, that are necessary for long-term freedoms simply don't exist.  What chance have these people to realize their dreams of freedom? Where is hope to be found?  In many regions leadership change is frequent, but the results seem to remain the same.  So the ability to influence change does not equal making things better.

It is necessary when thinking about complex and important issues to first define terms.  Friedman writes there are different ways of defining freedom.  He explains that over the past few years many peoples in search of freedoms have overthrown or replaced autocrats, systems and governments, and in doing so have become "free-from" them, but often they failed to achieve the notion of "free-to."  They have failed to become "free-to" vote in a democratic government, have a reasonable level of personal security, practice their religion in a safe environment, express themselves in art, express one's opinions in public without fear, establish the rule of law, gain an education for both sexes, create a trusted and stable economic system where one can engage in commerce and wealth generation, etc.  The concept of "free-to" rather than "free-from" is powerful.  How can mobile technologies promote and support an environment that is "free-to?"

Friedman goes on to write, "Values-based legal systems and institutions are just what so many societies have failed to build after overthrowing their autocrats." That’s why the world today can be divided into three kinds of spaces:
  1. Countries with “sustainable order,” or order based on shared values, stable institutions and consensual politics
  2. Countries with "imposed order," or order based on an iron-fisted, top-down leadership, or propped-up by oil money, or combinations of both, but no real shared values or institutions
  3. Regions of "disorder," where there is neither an iron fist from above nor shared values from below to hold states together.
Can mobile technologies not just support and influence "free-from" efforts, but also "free-to" efforts?" I believe the answer is yes.
  • I think of mobile payments supported by stable, trusted multinational organizations that adhere to internationally accepted norms and laws.  Multinational organizations beyond the control of regional "imposed order" or "disorder."  They provide trusted mobile apps and mobile payment systems with cross-border and multi-currency support.  They provide transparency and accountability.  They enable direct payments to mobile phone accounts that are beyond the reach of corrupt hands.
  • I think of mobile commerce.  The ability to buy and sell via online markets beyond the control of local thugs  
  • I think of online education available to anyone with Internet connectivity and a smartphone.
  • I think of the ability to share ideas, organize and to collaborate using mobile phones.
  • I think of idea exchanges and connections that enhance innovations
  • I think of micro-loans that enable start-ups and small businesses to grow 
  • I think of data collection and news reporting in near real-time via mobile devices
Can shared values, stable institutions and consensual politics, the building blocks of a "free-to" environment, also be developed and supported via mobile devices connected to the Internet?  If peoples suffering under "imposed order" or "disorder" cannot realize the "free-to" environment within their country's borders, can they find it beyond in a mobile and digital world?

In considering current immigration debates, it is apparent the country you are born into means a lot. At birth you are either a winner or loser of life's lottery based on which side of a border you find yourself. On one side there is an abundance of "free-tos" and opportunities, while on the other there is not. Is it possible that we can change this model? Can mobile technologies and the Internet help create a more flexible boundary - perhaps even a mobile boundary beyond the control of local despots.  A boundary that can be reshaped and expanded as a result of mobile and digital technologies?  Can the digital world with mobile boundaries provide many of the "free-tos" that man-made borders on a map often deny today?  Can there be a digital universe in parallel to the physical where "free-tos" exist in abundance and are but a smartphone connection to the Internet away?

In the long-term, will the digital world be able to influence and shape the physical world to make it a better place?  I think the answer lies in how we move forward into the digital future.  Will we be able to move beyond our digital minutia, selfies and cat videos into nobler pursuits?  For the good of all, will we create shared values, stable and trusted institutions and consensual politics in the digital realm where we have failed in the physical?  Can we become a digital community of people who not only believe they are on a journey of progress and prosperity together, beyond the reach of despots, or will the tribalism and violence of the physical world invade and corrupt the digital as well?

Thoughts?
************************************************************************
Kevin Benedict
Writer, Speaker, Senior Analyst
Digital Transformation, EBA, Center for the Future of Work Cognizant
View my profile on LinkedIn
Learn about mobile strategies at MobileEnterpriseStrategies.com
Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict
Join the Linkedin Group Strategic Enterprise Mobility
Join the Google+ Community Mobile Enterprise Strategies
Recommended Strategy Book Code Halos
Recommended iPad App Code Halos for iPads

***Full Disclosure: These are my personal opinions. No company is silly enough to claim them. I am a mobility and digital transformation analyst, consultant and writer. I work with and have worked with many of the companies mentioned in my articles.

Mobile Health News Weekly – Week of August 24, 2014

The Mobile Health News Weekly is an online newsletter made up of the most interesting news and articles related to mobile health that I run across each week.  I am specifically targeting information that reflects market data and trends.

Also read Connected Globe News Weekly
Also read Field Mobility News Weekly
Also read Mobile Commerce News Weekly
Also read Mobile Cyber Security
Also read Mobility News Weekly

Looking for an enterprise mobility solution?  Read the Mobile Solution Directory Here!

Microsoft Corp. and TracFone Wireless announced a collaboration that will bring the benefits of smartphone technology and services to underserved and high-risk populations through a new mobile health management solution offered through providers and insurers.  Read Original Content

GlobalData forecasts the mobile health market to grow at a compound annual growth rate of 31.5 percent, from an estimated $3 billion in 2013 to $11.8 billion by 2018.  Read Original Content\

Remote monitoring of patients with implantable cardiac devices reduced the mortality rate for cardiac patients by 50 percent and improved their clinical status by nearly 10 percent in a randomized control trial recently sponsored by medical device company Biotronik.  Read Original Content

The cost and time to mobilize enterprise applications can actually meet or exceed the original cost and time to implement those systems. In their new report, “StarMobile Transforms Enterprise Apps into Mobile Apps”, 451 Research details the advantages of StarMobile’s app development tool and how it can drastically reduce the cost and time to mobilize enterprise applications. Download report here: http://starmobileinc.com/report-451research-starmobile-transforms-mobile-apps-into-enterprise-apps/

Berg Insight estimates the number of patients using connected home medical monitoring devices will grow at a compound annual growth rate of 44.4 percent to reach 19.1 million by 2018.  Read Original Content

Last summer, as part of its “What’s Your Healthy?” national campaign, Aetna launched the CarePass consumer website and mobile solution. Now, a year later, the insurer has decided to phase out CarePass by the end of 2014, as first reported by MobiHealthNews.  Read Original Content
Using a standard Internet connection and a personal computer while stationed in Germany, Dr. Partho Sengupta of the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai has proven the feasibility of conducting ultrasound examinations across the Atlantic Ocean using a robotic arm to examine a patient in Boston, Massachusetts.  Read Original Content

Chip maker Intel and the Michael J. Fox Foundation are teaming up on a project that will use wearable devices and data analytics to monitor treatment of patients suffering from Parkinson's disease. The partnership will involve Intel hardware and software and a data analysis platform.  Read Original Content

Apple Inc has been discussing how its "HealthKit" service will work with health providers at Mount Sinai, the Cleveland Clinic and Johns Hopkins as well as with Allscripts, a competitor to electronic health records provider Epic Systems, people familiar with the discussions said.  Read Original Content

Hackers are believed to have exploited a weakness caused by the Heartbleed bug to steal the personal data of 4.5 million patients from one of the USA’s largest medical firms, Community Health Systems.  Read Original Content

In an attempt to reach those veterans struggling to cope, a group of developers in Los Angeles is launching a free mobile app that offers support. The company hopes to help veterans by connecting them with other nearby veterans similarly struggling with mental health issues, while at the same time listing nearby health centers.  Read Original Content

Latest Articles on http://mobileenterprisestrategies.blogspot.com

GIS and IoT Sensors Deliver Savings and Innovations for Utilities
Mobile Expert Interviews: OpenMarket's Andy Shirey
Mobile Expert Interviews: Cellrox's Dror Nadler
The Role of Shamification in Gamification in Enterprise Mobility
Mobile Expert Interview: Motorola Solution's Mark Kirsten
Mobile Expert Interview: Harmon.ie's CEO Yaacov Cohen
Mobile and Digital Transformation on the Mercy Ships

Webinars of Note (Recorded)


Virtualization ≠ Mobilization


Whitepapers of Note


A Comparison of the StarMobile MORPH Protocol vs. Traditional Remote Computing Protocols

Don't Get SMACked - How Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud are Reshaping the Enterprise
Making BYOD Work for Your Organization
StarMobile Transforms Enterprise Apps into Mobile Apps

************************************************************************
Kevin Benedict
Writer, Speaker, Senior Analyst
Digital Transformation, EBA, Center for the Future of Work Cognizant
View my profile on LinkedIn
Learn about mobile strategies at MobileEnterpriseStrategies.com
Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict
Join the Linkedin Group Strategic Enterprise Mobility
Join the Google+ Community Mobile Enterprise Strategies
Recommended Strategy Book Code Halos
Recommended iPad App Code Halos for iPads

***Full Disclosure: These are my personal opinions. No company is silly enough to claim them. I am a mobility and digital transformation analyst, consultant and writer. I work with and have worked with many of the companies mentioned in my articles.

Monday, August 25, 2014

GIS and IoT Sensors Deliver Savings and Innovations for Utilities

Caleb Benedict
Research Analyst,
GIS and IoT 
I love sensors.  In my opinion we write too little about the role sensors play in the whole Internet of Things discussion.  Sensors are what measure things in the physical world and converts the information to digital.  This process is a key component of digital transformation which enables algorithms, artificial intelligence and machine learning to be implemented to help us more effectively manage our environments.  They are our eyes, ears, nose, etc., in remote places capturing activities, events and behaviors that help us eliminate blind spots and that give us situational awareness.

With sensors we can finally answer the age old question, "If a tree falls in the forest, and no one is around to hear it, does it make a sound?"  The answer is yes, if there are sensors in place to capture the data and wirelessly report on it.

In this article Research Analyst, GIS and IoT, Caleb Benedict, shares the role sensors play in several different use cases.  Enjoy!

Municipalities and utility companies face increasing support costs as infrastructures expand and require maintenance as communities grow. These costs include repairing water mains, locating leaks in sewer and water pipes, and the planning costs associated with expanding services for new construction and city development. These expenses are significant, and require careful management.  IoT sensors can be deployed to monitor utility systems and infrastructures effectively and have been found to generate a positive ROI.

A combination of GIS application and smart sensor technology has been proven to reduce water leakage, utility maintenance, and planning costs. By connecting wireless sensors to water lines that identify leaks based on acoustic, electromagnetic, and thermal technology utilities - leaks and damaged infrastructure can be found and located quickly.  The sensor data is captured and integrated with GIS applications that alert and show utility workers the damaged section of water line on a digital map (often on a tablet, ruggedized laptop or other mobile devices). The GIS application allows service technicians to immediately see where the damaged water line is located and any other infrastructures in the vicinity, which saves much time searching for the problem and enables timely repairs that limit damage and impact to surrounding areas and systems.

The research firm TechNavio forecasts the Global GIS market in the Utility industry will grow at a CAGR of 9.27 percent over the period 2013-2018. The use and combinations of sensor and GIS systems are expected to expand to new areas and markets as sensor technologies evolve and are able to capture and measure additional types of environments, while at the same time the price for each sensor diminishes.

In the past few years we have seen a movement towards smart grids and smart meters for electricity, water, and natural gas systems. I predict that by 2019 this will become a standard practice by the developed regions of the world.

Here are some recent case studies in wireless sensors and GIS adoption that I have been researching:

The Florida county of Miami-Dade recently embraced wireless sensors and applied sensors to their water system. In their first year alone they saved $800,000 and reduced water loss by 20%. http://bit.ly/1piIhSb

The city of Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C is using a GIS application to identify city easements and property where utility lines are located. Their applications tracks over 1000 miles of utility lines and saves the city time and money by giving field service technicians the ability to replace paper maps and quickly locate city infrastructure. http://bit.ly/1mqDx8m

The town of Old, Canada implemented wireless sensors to their water system and saved over $175,000 their first year and reduced water loss by 10%. http://bit.ly/1piIhSb

************************************************************************
Kevin Benedict
Writer, Speaker, Senior Analyst
Digital Transformation, EBA, Center for the Future of Work Cognizant
View my profile on LinkedIn
Learn about mobile strategies at MobileEnterpriseStrategies.com
Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict
Join the Linkedin Group Strategic Enterprise Mobility
Join the Google+ Community Mobile Enterprise Strategies
Recommended Strategy Book Code Halos
Recommended iPad App Code Halos for iPads

***Full Disclosure: These are my personal opinions. No company is silly enough to claim them. I am a mobility and digital transformation analyst, consultant and writer. I work with and have worked with many of the companies mentioned in my articles.