Wednesday, September 05, 2012

Kevin Benedict's What's New in HTML5 - Week of September 2, 2012

As many readers may know, Facebook replaced their HTML5 version of their mobile app a few weeks ago, in favor of a native application written in Object C.  It is much faster and smoother now, however, several functions disappeared with this change.  You can no longer just steal your friends photos by holding down on the image and selecting "Save Image."  You can also no longer simply swipe to delete a snarky comment that seemed funny when it first entered your brain, but now seems ill conceived (I used this a lot!), and pasted links are now handled awkwardly.  This is the give and take between HTML5 and native applications that makes our lives interesting.

Telenav’s Scout for Apps, the HTML5-based voice guided mobile GPS navigation service is now available for Android and Windows Phone platforms.  Read Original Content

Gizmodo asks “Do you prefer the unregulated world of HTML5 apps, or would you rather stick to the status quo of native apps, with their additional polish and ability to better function offline?” and receives a wide range of responses.  Read OriginalContent

Facebook has abandoned HTML5 and unveiled the rebuilt app (rewritten in Objective C) for iPhone and iPad devices, addressing numerous performance issues with the HTML5 version.  Read Original Content

Adobe has released the new version of Contribute, 6.5, now with HTML5 and jQuery Mobile support.  Read Original Content

This article, “Property Finder - a Cross-Platform HTML5 Mobile App”, is a tutorial for the development of a cross-platform HTML5 mobile app for searching property listings in the U.K. using JavaScript, jQuery Mobile, Knockout, and Apache Cordova (formerly called PhoneGap).  Read Original Content

HTML5 Apps
Rob Gravelle reviews and provides examples for using the HTML5 Canvas charting library PlotKit in this article from HTML Goodies.  Read Original Content

Research and Markets has added a new report titled “HTML5: New Monetization Opportunities for Service Providers”, which focuses on opportunities created by HTML5 and its implications for mobile applications.  Read Original Content

The new version of Firefox for Android is now available with new HTML5 capabilities, enabling developers to create Web apps and websites based on HTML5, JavaScript, CSS and other open Web standards.  Read Original Content

The website provides compatibility tables for support of HTML5, CSS3, SVG and more in desktop and mobile browsers.  This view is for HTML5 on mobile browsers.  Read Original Content

“HTML5 will fundamentally change the way we make video games.”  HTML5 is a great platform for powering games and the tools used to build them.  Developers need to be aware of the limitations and understand that the standard is still evolving.  ReadOriginal Content

The W3C has published the first editor’s draft of the HTML Responsive Images Extension, available here:  Read Original Content

Location analytics startup Placed has announced the launch of support for mobile websites, now providing location data from any mobile browser that supports HTML5.  ReadOriginal Content

Recent research from ComScore MobiLens revealed a preference for mobile users to download content via apps (51.1 percent) rather than through a browser (49.8 percent).  Organizations must decide the best fit for their business - mobile apps or mobile websites.  Mike Ricci from Webtrends believes that HTML5 provides developers a tool for creating a mobile website that is virtually indistinguishable from an app and actually addresses some of the shortcomings for apps, closing the gap between apps and mobile websites.  Read Original Content

Microsoft is adding more HTML5 and CSS3 features in Internet Explorer 10 and is showing them off in a partnership with Atari that brings users 8 classic games.  Read OriginalContent

Kevin Benedict, Mobile Industry Analyst and Mobile Strategy Consultant
Follow me on Twitter @krbenedict
Join the SAP Enterprise Mobility Linkedin Group
Full Disclosure: I am a mobility analyst, consultant and blogger. I work with and have worked with many of the companies mentioned in my articles.